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Early Greenland settler “Inuk” has whole genome decoded

Early Greenland settler “Inuk” has whole genome decoded

Genomics can yield knowledge about now-extinct cultures. The remains of 4,000-year-old “Inuk” – “Person” in Inuit languages – were found in Qeqertasussuk, Greenland. From four frozen hair strands, Morten Rasmussen and Eske Willerslev sequenced the genome of one of the earliest known inhabitants of the Arctic. Genetic evidence traced his lineage to Siberia around 5,500 years ago, as part of a previously unknown migration. The man probably had Type A+ blood, shovel-graded front teeth, and dry earwax typical of modern East Asians and Native Americans.

Did you know? Inuk was the ninth human to have their entire genome sequenced but unlike the previous eight, he had been deceased for millennia.

2010