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1900 | The Emergence of Mendelian Genetics

1900 | The Emergence of Mendelian Genetics

Mendel’s work was relatively unknown until 1900 when three botanists - Hugo DeVries, Carl Correns and Erich von Tschermak – each independently verified Mendel's work. Two years later British biologist William Bateson would coin the term “genetics” to describe the new field focusing on Mendel’s laws on inheritance. Additional important discoveries related to chromosomes followed, which led to the acceptance of the laws Mendelian inheritance in the study of evolution and inheritance.  The Mendelian approach to inheritance proved to be very influential for eugenicists, especially in the U.S. The most prominent U.S. eugenicist was Charles Davenport, who had been an early proponent of the biometric approach to inheritance, embraced the Mendelian approach and sought to apply it to the U.S. eugenics movement.

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