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Haemophilus influenzae becomes first bacterium genome sequenced

Haemophilus influenzae

Haemophilus influenzae becomes first bacterium genome sequenced

Sequencing the genome of bacterium Haemophilus influenzae, reported in May 1995, demonstrated for the first time that random “shotgun” sequencing could be applied to whole genomes with speed and accuracy. In conventional sequencing, genomes were laboriously broken down into ordered, overlapping segments (physical maps) before sequencing efforts began. In contrast, shotgun sequencing used powerful computational software to assemble short overlapping DNA fragments, without any preliminary physical map of the genome. Within months after completion of the H. influenzae project, the same method was successfully applied to another bacterium, Mycoplasma genitalium. Since then, this method has been used to sequence the genomes of many organisms.
1995